“Wild Cat Blues” – Clarence Williams’ Blue Five (1923)

Okeh; New York, July 30, 1923: Thomas Morris-c/John Mayfield-tb/Sidney Bechet-ss/Clarence Williams-p/Buddy Christian-bj.

 

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Sidney Bechet; New York, 1947: Photo source.

Sidney Bechet–the man behind that visceral, growling, vibrato sound of the soprano sax.

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Sidney Bechet; 1939: Photo/film clip from the Guardian.

 

 

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“Good Old Bosom Bread” – Hot Lips Page And His Band (1938)

Decca; New York, March 10, 1938: Hot Lips Page-t-v/Ben Smith-cl-as/Sam Simmons-ts/Jimmy Reynolds-p/Connie Wainwright-g/Wellman Braud-sb/Alfred Taylor-d.

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le saxophoniqte soprano Sidney Bechet et Oran “Hot Lips” Page au Jimmy Ryan, New Yok, 1942.
© Charles Peterson.

Photo source:

Sidney Bechet (left) never gave a performance that was less than “110%.” The younger “Hot Lips” Page looks like he’s learning a thing or two from the old man. The song featured today came out four years prior to this photo (sans Sidney Bechet).

Featured below, for contrast and comparison, is the original version of “Good Old Bosom Bread,” which was written by the pianist and leader, Chick Finney, and performed by the Original St. Louis Crackerjacks.

Another fantastic example of this hard swingin’ band from St. Louis. This song was recorded for Decca in 1936 along with other great tunes, including “Good Old Bosom Bread,” “Fussin’,” and “Swing Jackson.” Personnel: Elmer Ming, George Smith, Levi Madison, trumpets; Robert Scott, Walter Martin, Freddie Martine, Chick Franklin, reeds; Chick Finney, piano; William “Bede” Baskerville, guitar; Kermit Hayes, bass; Nicholas Haywood, drums.

A Youtube repost.